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2001 Census

 

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Extracts From the 2001 Census
For more detailed information go to Scotland's Census

For England Wales and Northern Ireland Go To National Statistics

 

2001 1991
Highland Scotland Highland
TOTAL POPULATION
Male 102,297 2,432,494 99,762
Female 106,617 2,629,517 104,242
Total 208,914 5,062,011 204,004
POPULATION AGE STRUCTURE (% total pop)
0-4 5.4 5.5 6.4
5-15 14.2 13.7 15.0
16-24 9.3 11.2 12.4
25-44 27.4 29.2 28.9
45-64 27.1 24.5 22.6
65-74 9.3 8.8 8.4
75-84 5.5 5.3 5.0
85+ 1.8 1.8 1.4
ETHNIC GROUP (% total pop)
White 99.2 98.0 99.5
Indian 0.1 0.3 0.0
Pakistani/other South Asian 0.2 0.8 0.1
Chinese 0.1 0.3 0.1
Other Groups 0.4 0.6 0.3
GAELIC LANGUAGE (% 3+ pop)
Those who can speak Gaelic 6.3 1.2 7.5
Those who can speak, read, write or understand Gaelic 9.1 1.9 n/a
RELIGION (% total pop)
Church of Scotland 48.1 42.4 n/a
Roman Catholic 6.8 15.9 n/a
Other Christian 12.0 6.8 n/a
Other religion 1.0 1.9 n/a
No religion 27.2 27.6 n/a
Didnít answer 4.9 5.5 n/a
LIVING ARRANGEMENTS (% 16+ pop*)
Living as a couple: 62.3 58.0 n/a
Married 53.7 49.8 n/a
Cohabiting 8.6 8.2 n/a
Not living as a couple: 37.7 42.0 n/a
Single (never married) 21.1 24.7 n/a
Married (or re-married) 0.7 0.7 n/a
Separated 2.6 3.0 n/a
Divorced 5.0 5.3 n/a
Widowed 8.3 8.4 n/a
*total 16+ pop 164,443 4,007,454 n/a

2001 1991
Highland Scotland Highland
COUNTRY OF BIRTH (% total pop)
Scotland 82.2 87.1 84.4
Other UK 14.7 9.1 12.7
Outwith UK 3.1 3.8 2.9
HEALTH (% total pop)
Limiting Long Term Illness 18.4 20.3 10.6
Reported state of general health:
Good 70.8 67.9 n/a
Fairly good 21.3 21.9 n/a
Not good 7.9 10.2 n/a
PROVISION OF UNPAID CARE - due to physical/mental ill health, disability or problems relating to old age (% total pop)
Provision of unpaid care 8.9 9.5 n/a
Number of hours per week unpaid care is given (% unpaid carers*)
1-19 hours per week 66.4 63.5 n/a
20-49 hours per week 11.2 12.5 n/a
50+ hours per week 22.3 24.0 n/a
*total no. unpaid carers 18,505 481,579 n/a
ECONOMIC ACTIVITY (% 16-74 year olds*)
Economically Active:
Males 75.2 71.7 80.3
Females 61.2 58.6 55.5
Total 68.1 65.0 67.7
Full time employees 38.9 40.3 40.4
Part time employees 12.9 11.1 10.9
Self employed 10.2 6.6 9.3
Unemployed 4.3 4.0 5.9
Full-time student 1.8 3.0 n/a
Economically Inactive:
Male 24.8 28.3 19.7
Female 38.8 41.4 44.5
Total 31.9 35.0 32.3
Retired 14.5 13.9 11.7
Student 2.4 4.3 3.6
Looking after family / home 5.9 5.5 n\a
Permanently sick / disabled 5.6 7.4 3.3
Other 3.5 3.9 n\a
*total 16-74 year olds 152,684 3,731,079 147,282

4 August 2003
Today, the Registrar General for Scotland released his Annual Review of Demographic Trends.

As well as updating the demographic trends presented in last yearís review, this report focuses on one of the biggest issues affecting population change in Scotland today - declining fertility.

The Registrar General, John Randall said:

"Scotlandís birth rate has fallen significantly in the last two decades and it is currently at the lowest level of any of the countries in the UK. Moreover, Scotlandís population is now declining more because of an excess of deaths over births than because of net migration loss and this is projected to continue."

Along with an overview of population change, this yearís review contains two chapters on fertility:

  • a detailed examination of recent trends in Scotlandís fertility;
  • an article commissioned from Dr Elspeth Graham and Professor Paul Boyle of St Andrews University, which places Scotlandís fertility in a wider geographical context, discusses the reasons for low fertility, and addresses the scope for policy intervention drawing on the experience of other countries.

The report highlights the following:

Population

  • Scotlandís population fell in the year to 30 June 2002 to 5,054,800 (0.2 per cent down from mid-2001) - a level last seen in the first half of the 20th century.
  • Scotland has recorded a natural decrease (an excess of deaths over births) since 1997. The natural decrease (6,065 in 2001-02) was a larger factor in population decline than emigration, a pattern which is projected to continue.
  • Scotlandís population is getting older and is projected to continue ageing. Half the population is now over the age of 39, which is four years older than the 1991 equivalent.

Fertility

  • The total number of births registered in 2002 (51,270) was the lowest total ever recorded. This is the sixth consecutive year where the total has reached a new low.
  • Falling birth rates reflect the fact that women are having fewer children and having them later. As a consequence, average completed family size fell below two for women born after 1953 and is expected to fall further for younger women.
  • Fertility rates for women in their 20s are little more than half the rate 40 years ago while rates for women aged over 30 have steadily increased. * In 2002, for the first time, fertility rates for women aged 30-34 overtook those for 25-29 year olds.

Mortality

  • There were 58,103 deaths in 2002, an increase of 721 compared with 2001.
  • Stillbirth, perinatal, and infant mortality rates continue to fall and are at historically low levels, but remain above the EU average.
  • Expectation of life at birth continues to improve. The expectation of life for babies born in 2002 is 73.3 for males and 78.8 for females. Despite these improvements, expectation of life at birth in Scotland remains one of the lowest in the EU.
  • The main causes of death in Scotland are cancers and heart disease; over the last decade there has been a big fall in the latter but not the former.

Migration

  • Net emigration from Scotland is much lower than 40 years ago and even 15 years ago.
  • The pattern of net migration between Scotland and the rest of the UK varies markedly by age group for both males and females, with a net inflow peaking at age 19 and a net outflow peaking at age 23.
  • The peak ages for moves within Scotland (between Council areas) for males and females are the 20s and 30s with large peaks at the student ages (18-22).

Marriages, Divorces and Adoptions

  • There were 29,826 marriages registered in 2002, slightly more than the 29,621 registered the previous year.
  • The average age at first marriage continues to increase and in 2002 was 31 for males and 29 for females, four years higher for both than in 1991.
  • The number of divorces, while much higher than 30 years ago, has decreased slightly over the past decade.
  • The number of adoptions is 53 per cent lower than ten years ago and is the lowest total since 1931, the first full year in which adoptions were registered.

The Registrar Generalís Annual Review of Demographic Trends (ISBN 1-874451-71-0, #6) is available from the General Register Office for Scotland (GROS) and the GROS website (www.gro-scotland.gov.uk). The detailed statistical tables which comprise the bulk of previous Annual Reports are available by contacting GROS Customer Services on 0131 314 4243.

See Also
Population Links